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Can Increasing Your Baby's Risk Of Diabetes?


A recent study shows that first-year life-threatening cysts and other infections can increase the risk of Type 1 diabetes in infants by up to 20 percent.

Can Increasing Your Baby's Risk Of Diabetes?

It is not suspected that infections may play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Experts have been suspicious that virus infections may be the cause of the disease. However, it is not yet clear exactly how such infections can contribute to the development of Type 1 diabetes. " study author author, Andreas Beyerlein, a researcher at the Diabetes Research Institute in Munich.
Animal experiments have shown extensively that different viruses can exert a variety of effects on the beta cells in the pancreas. Some viruses, for example, cause cells to degrade, while others stimulate cells of the immune system to attack the beta cells over the years because they are perceived as foreign by invaders rather than healthy tissue. Whatever the cause of death, the result in type 1 diabetic patients is that too few healthy byte cells remain to make enough insulin to make up for it.
For the present study, we examined the data of infants born between 2005 and 2007. The database that was used for the study covers about 85 percent of the population in Germany. Nearly 300,000 infants were born during the study period and 720 children developed type 1 diabetes in a follow-up of approximately 8.5 years.
Almost everyone (93%) among children has had at least the first two years of an infectious life, as has 97% of children with type 1 diabetes. Infections are also broken down into categories (lymphatic, stomach, skin, and eyes) and also by disease, for example, viral or bacterial.
Children who died infectiously within the first six months of life had a 17 percent higher risk of developing type 1 diabetes in the elderly. And those who had a first-year viral infection had a 19 percent higher risk of Type 1 diabetes than those who had not been infected with a virus during their infancy.
Dunne says one reason for this is that the virus has somehow trained the immune system.
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